The Curriculum of the Steiner School - Class 8

Notes and Lesson Plans

Famous Speeches
updated September 3, 2022


Recorded here is my own personal collection of articles, resources, favorite links, teaching ideas, and lesson plans. It encompasses many years, from the very beginning of my experience studying and learning about Waldorf to the present time. People from all around the world visit my site and recommend it to others. Welcome!

This site records my journey. I hope my honesty is encouraging and helps break down some barriers that may prevent people from trying Waldorf methods. Because this is an ongoing site documenting my curriculum planning and ideas, some materials are more Waldorf-y than others. Please feel free to take what you like and leave the rest.

This page has helpful links and LOADS of free resources to help you plan your eighth grade year. Enjoy!



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Famous Speeches
for Class 8


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Rationale

Kate Gould's helpful essay, "A Journey through the Grades Waldorf Style," includes a mention of studying Famous Speeches in Grade 8.

Anyone have any idea what speeches they might include in a block like this? Or how many?
Obviously, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. "I Have a Dream" August 28, 1963


AHA! In searching for a speech by Winston Churchill, I've run across an article by Time magazine, From the Podium: Top Ten Greatest Speeches

It's actually a decent list although, sadly, male-dominated and mostly centered on our own country.

The full text of each one is included:

    Socrates "Apology," 4th century BC

    Patrick Henry "Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death," 1775

    Frederick Douglass "The Hypocrisy of American Slavery," 1852

    Abraham Lincoln "Gettysburg Address," 1863

    Susan B. Anthony "Women's Rights to the Suffrage," 1873

    Winston Churchill "Blood, Toil, Tears and Sweat," 1940

    John F. Kennedy "Inaugural Address," 1961

    Martin Luther King, Jr. "I Have a Dream," 1963

    Lyndon B. Johnson "The American Promise," 1965

    Ronald Reagan "Remarks at the Brandenburg Gate," 1987


"Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death"
Colonial Williamsburg

    Richard Schumann interprets the character of Patrick Henry for The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation. Listen as he re-creates Patrick Henry's powerful words spoken March 23, 1775 at St. John's Henrico Parish Church in Richmond. Listen to the full speech (audio clip 7:05)


And my mind is wondering if lectures, such as compelling TED talks, could find their way in there, since the study is of rhetoric. Is this an opportunity to compare and contrast? Or is it off topic?

What IS the difference between a famous speech and a great talk?



I'll continue to add notes as I develop my thoughts about this topic. If you want to comment or share an idea, please visit my Famous Speeches blog post and we can chat!



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